People Moko Maori | Freindly moko Dolphine | Guidence moko people

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The traditional form of ta moko was practised by men who were both skilled artists and religious ritual experts called tohunga. A woman’s moko, which covered the chin and lips, could take one or two days to complete. A man’s moko, which covered the whole face, was done in stages over several years.
The man pictured here is a Maori from Aotearoa (the Maori word for New Zealand). The marks on his face are called ta moko. Each individual’s ta moko is unique and sacred.

The traditional way of applying ta moko to the face was to dip a narrow blade in black pigment and then tap the blade with a mallet to chisel deep incisions into the skin.Keeping up with friends can be hard work - but not on MOKO. Every member gets their own friends list - so they can see when all their pals are online, invite them to come and chat and even send them private messages!

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The bone chisels used for tattooing can be found in archaeological sites of various ages in NewZealan as well as in some early Eastern Polynesian sites. Although the Māori practiced tattooing, there is no evidence that the Morioripeople did.
In New Zealand It is in the early sites that the widest chisel blades are found, and this lends evidence to the theory that there was possibly a preference towards rectilinear tattoo patterns in earlier times.
The head was considered the most sacred part of the body, and because tattooing caused blood to run the tattoo craftsmen, or tohunga-ta-oko, were very tapu persons. All high-ranking Māori were tattooed, and those who went without tattoos were seen as persons of no social status.
Tattooing commenced at puberty, accompanied by many rites and rituals. In addition to making a warrior attractive to women, the tattoo practice marked both rites of passage and important events in a person's life.
There were certain prohibitions during the tattooing process, and for the facial tattoo in particular sexual intimacy and the eating of solid foods were prohibited. In order to overcome this, liquid food and water was drained into a wooden funnel, to ensure that no contaminating product came into contact with the swollen skin. This was also the only way the tattooed person could eat until his or her wounds healed.
The full faced tattoo was very time consuming, and a good tattoo craftsman would carefully study a person's bone structure before commencing his art.
The tattoo instrument was a bone chisel, either with a serrated or an extremely sharp straight edge. The first stage of the tattoo commenced with the graving of deep cuts into the skin. Next, a chisel was dipped into a sooty type pigment such as burnt Kauri gum or burnt vegetable caterpillars, and then tapped into the skin.
It was an extremely painful and long process, and often leaves from the native Karaka tree were placed over the swollen tattoo cuts to hasten the healing process. Wars were frequent, and the warriors had little time for recuperation. During the tattooing process, flute music and chant poems were performed to help soothe the pain.
Although the tattoos were mainly facial, the North Auckland warriors included swirling double spirals on both buttocks, often leading down their legs until the knee.

Until the early twentieth century when it was still widely practised, there were many customs associated with moko. Records of these customs have been lost as older generations of Maori people have died. This means there are some things about early ta moko that are not known. For example, some people argue that moko was only worn by people of high status, whilst others say most Maori men and women wore it.People have described wearing moko as like having your name written on your face in beautiful writing. At one time, each person’s moko was different. In the nineteenth century some chiefs drew their moko on official documents in place of a signature. Some say that even a man’s tribal affiliations, status, job, accomplishments, whether he was married, and information about his parents were all recorded in his moko.
In the 1970s, Maori women who had had moko applied in the early twentieth century told of their reasons for having it. Some said that they wanted to show their mothers that the Maori tradition would not die. One woman said, ‘a Maori lady was not a lady unless she had a moko’ and that she ‘felt bare walking around without one’. Another woman said, ‘this was my powder and lipstick’At the beginning of the twenty-first century Maori people who wear moko say they are asserting their identity as Maorit is not known exactly when Moko was first sighted off the east coast of the North Island, New Zealand but reports show that he first became known in 2007 at Mahia beach. Moko is the maori (native New Zealander) name for the traditional tattoo and the culture that surrounds it. A moko reflects the whakapapa (genealogy) of the wearer. Who originally named the young Dolphin and why is not known

 It is not known exactly when Moko was first sighted off the east coast of the North Island, New Zealand but reports show that he first became known in 2007 at Mahia beach. Moko is the maori (native New Zealander) name for the traditional tattoo and the culture that surrounds it. A moko reflects the whakapapa (genealogy) of the wearer. Who originally named the young Dolphin.

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