Vanity Fair Describe By Funy Girl | Vanity Fair Article Arror

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The problem, which was first reported by the website Politico, was that the boy the reporter described was another child with Down syndrome.

The mother of that child, conservative activist Gina Loudon, told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that she told Gross during the rally that the child in the stroller was her son, not Palin's. She said she tried to make it clear because the two children look a lot alike.

"I told him that. And he ignored it," Loudon said. "It's not even like he didn't fact check — he just ignored facts."

Reporter Michael Joseph Gross describes Palin's youngest son, Trig, being pushed in a stroller by his older sister, Piper, before a rally in May in the Kansas City suburb of Independence.

"When the girl, Piper Palin, turns around, she sees her parents thronged by admirers, and the crowd rolling toward her and the baby, her brother Trig, born with Down syndrome in 2008," according to the article. "Sarah Palin and her husband, Todd, bend down and give a moment to the children; a woman, perhaps a nanny, whisks the boy away; and Todd hands Sarah her speech and walks her to the stage."

Later, Gross describes Piper joining her mother on the stage to "allow Palin to make a public display of maternal affection."
Reporter Michael Joseph Gross describes Palin's youngest son, Trig, being pushed in a stroller by his older sister, Piper, before a rally in May in the Kansas City suburb of Independence.

"When the girl, Piper Palin, turns around, she sees her parents thronged by admirers, and the crowd rolling toward her and the baby, her brother Trig, born with Down syndrome in 2008," according to the article. "Sarah Palin and her husband, Todd, bend down and give a moment to the children; a woman, perhaps a nanny, whisks the boy away; and Todd hands Sarah her speech and walks her to the stage."

Later, Gross describes Piper joining her mother on the stage to "allow Palin to make a public display of maternal affection."

"When the girl, Piper Palin, turns around, she sees her parents thronged by admirers, and the crowd rolling toward her and the baby, her brother Trig, born with Down syndrome in 2008," according to the article. "Sarah Palin and her husband, Todd, bend down and give a moment to the children; a woman, perhaps a nanny, whisks the boy away; and Todd hands Sarah her speech and walks her to the stage."


The mother of that child, conservative activist Gina Loudon, told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that she told Gross during the rally that the child in the stroller was her son, not Palin's. She said she tried to make it clear because the two children look a lot alike.

"I told him that. And he ignored it," Loudon said. "It's not even like he didn't fact check - he just ignored facts."

Palin almost never talks to neutral media outlets, leaving her - as critics accurately note - subject to none of the questions, challenges and reality checks that the political press puts regularly to almost every other national political figure. She takes a lot of heat for this, deservedly.

But with the hunger for information about her, and the traffic she drives, the press sometimes compensates by printing such thinly sourced, badly reported nonsense about her that it's hard to imagine it making it into a serious magazine like Vanity Fair if it concerned any other figure. Of course, this might not happen if she spoke to reporters, but that's no excuse.


Palin almost never talks to neutral media outlets, leaving her - as critics accurately note - subject to none of the questions, challenges and reality checks that the political press puts regularly to almost every other national political figure. She takes a lot of heat for this, deservedly.

But with the hunger for information about her, and the traffic she drives, the press sometimes compensates by printing such thinly sourced, badly reported nonsense about her that it's hard to imagine it making it into a serious magazine like Vanity Fair if it concerned any other figure. Of course, this might not happen if she spoke to reporters, but that's no excuse.



I WAS EXCITED about buying my first issue of Vanity Fair the other day, as one of my role models, Tina Fey, was on the cover. I was expecting to find an article about her enormous success as an outstanding female comedian, or perhaps a few details about significant life events. Instead I found a disappointing article that focused too much on her hair, weight, and love life. I am an aspiring female comedian and am sensitive to the double standard women comedians must live up to. No matter what we women do, especially in the media, we are first expected to be beautiful before we can be funny or political. Do you think an article about a male comedian would focus on how much body hair he may have had to remove to become successful? I don’t think so

This wasn't a casual mistake. Gross was specifically told what the truth was. Even if he wanted to say that a Palin sympathizer was trying to cover for Palin, the least he could have done was report that as well. Instead he reported the worst version of the story.

This is the same guy who tried to peddle the notion that he was really in favor of Sarah Palin before writing the book. Wonder what he would have done if he didn't like Palin from the start? Then he said (and the media repeated) that he had other stuff that he didn't include. Well, my gosh, the stuff that he included was so horrible, wasn't it?


"When the girl, Piper Palin, turns around, she sees her parents thronged by admirers, and the crowd rolling toward her and the baby, her brother Trig, born with Down syndrome in 2008," according to the article. "Sarah Palin and her husband, Todd, bend down and give a moment to the children; a woman, perhaps a nanny, whisks the boy away; and Todd hands Sarah her speech and walks her to the stage."

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